Abbi Jacobson Quotes

I drew a lot. I always had sketchbooks. My parents were really great about any gift-giving holiday – birthdays, Hanukkah, Christmas – it was always art supplies for my brother and I.
I recently saw this home video where my brother is playing this character Arsenio Grimley, who is a mix of Arsenio Hall and Ed Grimley – which, clearly, is my parents’ doing, because he’s, like, 10. He’s the host, I’m every guest, and then my dad is Elton John. That was a Saturday night.
I am obsessed with the painter Jonas Wood, but I don’t think I’ll ever be able to afford one of his paintings. He’s an L.A.-based painter; his stuff is incredible.
I definitely started to perform a little bit in middle school, but not the typical musical/play route. I think that I am funny, but it was more of a social thing, where that was my part in my circle of friends.
I had a weirdly awesome high-school experience.
I really admire people that do more than one thing. That’s sort of the goal, right – to be an artist that can work in any medium. That’s what I hope for my career.
You know how when you get older you actually want to learn? When I went to college, I wasn’t as interested in the art history classes as I am now.
I ended up going to college for visual arts but moved up to New York after I graduated from college in 2006 and started going gung ho to the Upright Citizens Brigade, and I realized that that was what I was really interested in and what I really wanted to do.
Female-driven shows have to be every single thing and are constantly criticized in a way that male-driven shows are not.
I’ve been watching ‘The Cosby Show’ and ‘Roseanne’ a lot right now, and those work so well because they’re not, like, jokey comedies; they are coming from real characters. We want our show to be like that. A family show.
We love to start from a real place, whether it’s us or our friends or working on a story from a writer’s friend.
I’m from Philadelphia, and I go to Philly a bunch throughout the holidays, which is my only time to see my family, so we get pretty festive around that time of year. It’s also the only time I have vacation.
Everybody has will – you just have to gather it. And I guess you choose where your inspiration comes from and give yourself that permission.
When we make the show, we are always talking about how the show is really in between what we make and what the viewer thinks of it.
I find the most normal things about famous people to be the most fascinating.
I’m from outside Philadelphia, a town called Wayne, which is, like, 25 minutes northwest.
There haven’t been a lot of superhero movies with female leads, and there have been even fewer – if any – that were truly funny. I heard Ant-Man was, but I haven’t seen that yet. So, that would be my goal, my dream – to be a super-heroine who’s not afraid to be feminine and also not afraid to make people laugh.
I definitely relate so much to a lot of women in comedy, but I don’t love segregating the genders. I’m just as influenced by male comedians as I am female comedians.
We couldn’t pitch the show without having created one, at least one 20 to 25 minute version of ‘Broad City.’ We wouldn’t know how to describe it.
I just got really into this one girl on Instagram and had her paint little pineapples on my nails during shooting.
I sometimes worry that maybe it’s better to be really good at one thing than be okay at a couple things.
I really, really like interior design. I grew up in a really old house outside of Philly that was built in 1821. My mom is really into antiques, and my dad is very mid-century. They’re not together anymore, so in the middle of growing up, I, all of the sudden, had two houses that were very different but really well done in each of their own ways.
Why does ‘writer’ have no gender, but ‘actor’ has a gender? What is that?
Sometimes the art world can be a scary place, and you feel like you should know more than you do, but it’s okay to not know everything!
Someone like Amy Poehler, I don’t know, but I feel like I know her. I think everyone feels like they know her.
I had this job where I had to cold call people, and that was terrifying to me, and that was on a far different level than invading their space.
We just sort of thought a Web series would be a cool thing to be able to send to our parents to show them that we were, in fact, actually doing comedy.
I love Maira Kalman. She’s an amazing illustrator and writer. I’ve loved her since I was in college, but when I moved to New York and experienced the same city she was drawing and writing about, I developed a whole new appreciation. Her work made me observe everything so much deeper and more joyfully.
If anything can be art, then anyone can be an artist.
You know all those young people watching Comedy Central love ‘Frasier.’
I didn’t go to school for illustration. I did larger pieces, mostly drawings and paintings, and minored in video, but when I moved to N.Y.C., I didn’t have a studio space anymore and downsized to my desk and started illustrating. I started a greeting card company and sold cards all over the city.
When I lived in Baltimore, I would come down fairly often to go to the Hirshhorn, and one of my good friends from high school went to Georgetown. I actually ended up going to Annapolis a lot. I had a car, and it was such a serene place to drive.
We live in such a celebrity-driven culture, but all those people have to go buy toilet paper, and all those people have products they use and their favorite sweet treats. They all have to write to-do lists, and they’re all reading books – well, hopefully most people are doing those things.
I’m not a political comic.
Man, Amy Ryan. I have geeked out so hard for her – to her face! There aren’t a lot of people that can cross those lines of drama and comedy so seamlessly as Amy Ryan.
Art school can be a wonderful place if you’re trying to find your voice and your style and your taste.
I will say that a lot of art, some of the best art, has very powerful and meaningful messages behind it, and the more you read the stuff on the walls, the more you learn the artist’s intention, and you have a totally new point of view of what it’s about.
Everything on ‘Broad City’ that my character has drawn is my stuff from years and years ago.
I feel like comedy had a boys’-club label when we were starting.
It’s very natural and simple to me, drawing, because I’ve drawn since I was a kid. It’s just the most normal thing for me to do. And it’s very meditative.
I wasn’t in the art world at all as a kid; I was just creative, and we were always doing arts and crafts.
I started getting really interested in comedy when I was in middle school.
Museums are interesting. This place where we’re almost buying admission to take a break from our lives.
I’m so thankful for that struggling period. That time is really great where you have no idea what’s going to happen.
When I was in high school, my mom worked at Bed, Bath and Beyond, so I was always there.
If people watch ‘Broad City’ very closely, we just drop lines about people we love, just to say we like them.
I’m not super, super religious. If this is okay to say, I’m more culturally Jewish.
I’m really inspired by the power of the individual. People like Gloria Steinem.
I would love to be at a place where a girl character can also be a role model for young boys.
What I love about comedy is that it’s unquestionably working. There are varying degrees of that, where there’s something that makes you smile and is funny versus something that makes you hysterically laugh.
I really want to continue doing art. I would love to go back to doing paintings one day.
I always have a good pen with me.
I find young people talk about what they want to do, which is great because you get to form the words, but its also like, you gotta just get in there.
I’m a big Sephora fan.
I would love, obviously, someone like Gloria Steinem to do anything with me. We would obviously have to get lunch after, and she’d have to sign stuff for me.
Before ‘Broad City,’ I had a lot of jobs that I knew were not for me, but when you’re young and don’t know exactly what you’re going to do, if an opportunity comes up, you feel like, ‘This is an opportunity; I have to try it.’

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